Weekly Photo Challenge: Relic

Relic 1

This International Boundary Monument sits on top of Iceberg Point on Lopez Island, WA and marks the 7th turning point of the US – Canada border along the 49th parallel.  As part of my plan to see as much of this beautiful island as possible in  a four-day vacation we spent a wonderful afternoon hiking through forest, salmon berry tunnels and shoulder-high grasslands before finally reaching these cliffs at the southernmost tip of Lopez.  This 6 foot tall concrete monument has been in place since the 1908 treaty between US and Canada and the bronze plaque below was added in 1927.

Relic 2

    Posted as part of the Weekly Photo Challenge:  Relic.

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36 thoughts on “Weekly Photo Challenge: Relic

  1. Speaking of relics, while you’re on Lopez…if you see any live music ads for a gent named Teddy Deane, he would be a lot of fun to spend a couple sets with.

      1. He is a world-class musician. I’ve had the pleasure and honor of playing with him many times. We were bandmates in the late 70s-early 80s. He plays all manner of reeds, piano, and a gracious flute. He also writes musicals. He and Alice have lived on Lopez for many years.

      2. I’m making a note right now and will look for him when we go back, thanks for the information, Jim. Lopez is a beautiful island and from our short stay I can tell it attracts some really wonderful people.

  2. Looks like a great island to explore. I just looked at the map and Lopez is quite a large island, it looks about twice the size of Pender. Hope you had a great trip.

  3. Pingback: 7-15-14 Weekly Photo Challenge: Relic (Home Base Edition) | The Quotidian Hudson

    1. Thanks, Jann! I was happy to have a great reason to use these photos and it’s great to hear you like them. A thrill is a good way to describe how fun it is to discover boundary markers. They really feel like a connection to our history.

  4. Wonderful shot – looks like man-made concrete and nature are together as one side by side. But I must say the relic stands out a wee bit, it’s so much closer to the camera, after all. It didn’t look like a windy day there? I like visiting seas but am not huge fan of gusty seawinds.

  5. vastlycurious.com

    Perfect for the challenge and glorious weather ! Are there more than 7 Turning points? I have never heard that term before.

    1. The weather was wonderful, Kathryn. Some of the best days I’ve ever seen in this area! I didn’t know about turning points either but these 7 mark the points where the border shifts off of a straight line. I’m sure there are more across the country lines – maybe a mapping fan can help us with more information!

  6. Patrick

    Thanks for sharing such a beautiful picture from your hike Lisa. It has brightened my day and is a good visual rest from the 70’s colors of my cubicle. Patrick

  7. I was really intrigued by this post because I had never heard of these turning points before. A quick search identified that the Canadian/US Boundary over water is 3830 kilometres / 2380 miles and identified by a series of straight lines which intersect at unmarked turning points. There are 5723 Turning Points and 2457 Reference Monuments.

    I puzzled over what that meant and decided that just over 40% of the turning points are marked with reference monuments. I’m guessing they are numbered from west to east.

    In comparison, the boundary on Land is 5061 kilometres / 3145 miles, of which 2172 kilometres through forest requires clearing of a 6 metre ‘border’ on a regular basis. There are 5528 boundary monuments to mark the border on land.

    The plaque on the monument at Iceberg Point suggests it is a triangulation station since it provides surveying coordinates and it located on the top of a prominent hill.

    Thanks for the interesting photos!! I learned something new today … although with all those numbers, it’s unlikely I”m going to remember it all 🙂

    1. Wow, thanks for sharing your research, Joanne! Yes, the Iceberg Point marker is a triangulation station and the actual turning point is about 1500 feet away over the water. It would be fun to search the San Juan Islands for the remaining 6 turning points… maybe our next trip. 🙂

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